Teeth outside the mouth in teleost fishes: how to benefit from a developmental accident

@article{Sire2001TeethOT,
  title={Teeth outside the mouth in teleost fishes: how to benefit from a developmental accident},
  author={J. Sire},
  journal={Evolution \& Development},
  year={2001},
  volume={3}
}
  • J. Sire
  • Published 2001
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Evolution & Development
SUMMARY Evolution proceeds by the selection of characters that enhance survival rates so that the long‐term outcome for a species is better adaptation to its environment. These new characters are “accidentally” acquired, mostly through mutations leading to modifications of developmental events. However, changes that lead to the ectopic expression of an organ are rare and, whereas their subsequent selection for a new role is even more rare, such a scenario has apparently occurred for denticles… Expand
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