Technology and Copyright in 1735: The Engraver's Act

@article{Rose2005TechnologyAC,
  title={Technology and Copyright in 1735: The Engraver's Act},
  author={Mark Rose},
  journal={The Information Society},
  year={2005},
  volume={21},
  pages={63 - 66}
}
  • M. Rose
  • Published 1 January 2005
  • Law
  • The Information Society
Without printing technology there would be no need for copyright. Anglo-American copyright has its roots in early booksellers' practices that in 1710 were incorporated into the Statute of Anne. Several decades later in 1735 the provisions of this statute were copied in a new piece of legislation for the protection of engravings. However, “Hogarth's Act” protected only those engravings that involved original designs and thus, implicitly, made a distinction between artists and mere craftsmen… 

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THE PHOTOGR APH AS ACH

  • 2018

Introduction

  • The European Encyclopedia
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Authorship in Encyclopedias

  • The European Encyclopedia
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References

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The invention of copyright (Cambridge, MA, 1993) and L

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Gaines discusses the process of abstraction at work in Burrow–Giles in contested culture: The image, the voice, and the law (Chapel

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