Techniques of the observer

@inproceedings{Crary1990TechniquesOT,
  title={Techniques of the observer},
  author={Jonathan Crary},
  year={1990}
}
ion necessary for Brewster's industrial delirium is made possible by the same forces of modernization that allowed Baudelaire to use the kaleidoscope as a model for the kinetic experience of "the multiplicity of life itself and the flickering race of all its elements."44 43. Sir David Brewster, The Kaleidoscope: Its History, Theory, and Construction [1819], rpt. London, John Murray, 1858, pp. 134-136. 44. Charles Baudelaire, "Le peintre de la vie moderne," Oeuvres complites, Paris, Gallimard… 

Anamorphosis and the Eccentric Observer: History, Technique and Current Practice

In the first part of this two-part article, published in Leonardo, Vol. 25, No. 1 (1992), the author reviewed the discovery of anamorphic projection in the late fifteenth century and traced its

IN THE EYE OF THE BEHOLDER: HELMHOLTZIAN PERCEPTION AND THE ORIGINS OF FREUD'S 1900 THEORY OF TRANSFERENCE

  • G. Makari
  • Psychology, Art
    Journal of the American Psychoanalytic Association
  • 1994
TLDR
The author maps out the post-Kantian philosophical and German physiological currents that gave rise to Hermann von Helmholtz's influential work on perception, and proposes that Freud's 1900 theory of transference was a creative synthesis of novel notions like unconscious wishing and psychic defense with a Helmholzian model of visual illusion.

Singular Devices: Minds at Work from Montesquieu to Diderot

Abstract: Eighteenth-century descriptions of esprit and the persona of the thinker often insisted on the interplay of “le physique et le moral.” This idea was often illustrated through analogies that

Surgical Injury and Narrative Cure in Wilkie Collins's Poor Miss Finch and Heart and Science

The increased use of surgical medicine in the mid-to-late Victorian period acquainted English culture with a host of disquieting images, and a literary survey of the rise of the surgical field

‘An attempt to trace illusions to their physical causes’: atmospheric mirages and the performance of their demystification in the 1820s and 1830s

  • Fiona Amery
  • History
    The British Journal for the History of Science
  • 2020
TLDR
It is argued that the mirage exhibited the fallibility of the eyes as a tool for veridical perception in a marvellous and striking way, with consequences for the perceived trustworthiness of ocular knowledge in the period.

From the stage to the laboratory: magicians, psychologists, and the science of illusion.

TLDR
This article attempts to explain why five men belonging to a profession in which secrecy was vital agreed to enter the laboratory and reveal their tricks and argues that magicians saw themselves as men of science and that, by entering Binet's laboratory, they were responding to an opportunity to participate in a world to which they wished to belong.

The Doubly Wired Spectator: Marston’s Theory of Emotions and Psychophysiological Research on Cinematic Pleasure in the 1920s

In the 1920s, researchers attempted to gauge the emotional impact of motion pictures by measuring spectators’ respiration and blood pressure during screenings. This paper analyzes psychophysiological

Dream Technology: The Mechanization of the De Quinceyan Imagination

In Suspiria De Profundis (1845), Thomas De Quincey claims that modern life and technology inhibit imagination – particularly the mind’s capacity to dream. He believes that “the condition of human

Slitting open the Kantian Eye

In the second (and final) edition of the short-lived journal The Blind Man, an anonymous author, possibly Beatrice Wood, wrote about ‘The Richard Mutt Case’, accompanied by Alfred Stieglitz’s famous

Sight and Song : Transparent Translations and a Manifesto for the Observer

The freshness of the light, its secrecy, Spices, or honey from sweet-smelling bower, The harmony of time, love’s trembling hour Struck on thee with a new felicity. Standing, a child, by a red
...

References

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On Adorno, Wagner, and phantasmagoria, see Andreas Huyssen, After the Great Divide: Modernism, Mass Culture

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A Short History of Photography Artforum The ambivalence with which twentieth-century audiences have received 3-D movies and holography suggests the enduring problematic nature of such techniques

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In this sense, other optical instruments of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, like peep shows, Claude glasses, and print viewing boxes had the status of tools

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