Techniques of Terror, Technologies of Nationality: Ann Radcliffe's The Italian

@article{Schmitt1994TechniquesOT,
  title={Techniques of Terror, Technologies of Nationality: Ann Radcliffe's The Italian},
  author={Cannon Schmitt},
  journal={ELH},
  year={1994},
  volume={61},
  pages={853 - 876}
}
15 Citations
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