Techniques for preventing hypotension during spinal anaesthesia for caesarean section.

@article{Cyna2006TechniquesFP,
  title={Techniques for preventing hypotension during spinal anaesthesia for caesarean section.},
  author={A. Cyna and M. Andrew and R. Emmett and P. Middleton and S. Simmons},
  journal={The Cochrane database of systematic reviews},
  year={2006},
  volume={4},
  pages={
          CD002251
        }
}
BACKGROUND Maternal hypotension, the most frequent complication of spinal anaesthesia for caesarean section, can be associated with severe nausea or vomiting which can pose serious risks to the mother (unconsciousness, pulmonary aspiration) and baby (hypoxia, acidosis and neurological injury). OBJECTIVES To assess the effects of prophylactic interventions for hypotension following spinal anaesthesia for caesarean section. SEARCH STRATEGY We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth… Expand

Paper Mentions

Interventional Clinical Trial
This is prospective randomised double blind study conducted in parturients planned for non-elective caesarean section under spinal anaesthesia. Glycopyrrolate group will receive… Expand
ConditionsEffect of Drug, Glycopyrrolate, Hemodynamic Instability, (+1 more)
InterventionDrug
Interventional Clinical Trial
Epidural anesthesia, the most common method of pain control in labor, can contribute to alterations in maternal blood pressure and/or fetal heart rate changes. As a result, the… Expand
ConditionsFetus or Neonate Affected by Maternal Epidural Anesthesia During Labor and Delivery
InterventionDrug
Interventional Clinical Trial
Maternal hypotension after spinal anesthesia in parturients undergoing cesarean section is a very common problem leading to several complications to both patients and their babies. It… Expand
ConditionsAnesthesia; Adverse Effect, Spinal and Epidural
InterventionDrug
Interventional Clinical Trial
The aim of this study is to compare two different therapeutic approaches to blood pressure reduction: pharmacological vs. non-pharmacological. The setting is that of patients… Expand
ConditionsAnesthesia,Spinal, Cesarean Section, Hypotension, (+1 more)
InterventionDrug
Techniques for preventing hypotension during spinal anaesthesia for caesarean section.
TLDR
There were no clear differences between groups for maternal hypertension requiring intervention, and rates of bradycardia were lower in the ephedrine group than in the crystalloid group, and there were no serious adverse effects with any of the interventions investigated. Expand
Prevention of hypotension after spinal anaesthesia for caesarean section: a systematic review and network meta‐analysis of randomised controlled trials
TLDR
It is concluded that vasopressors should be given to healthy women to prevent hypotension during caesarean section with spinal anaesthesia. Expand
Fluid loading therapy to prevent spinal hypotension in women undergoing elective caesarean section
TLDR
A lack of data obviating an evidence-based recommendation on fluid loading in the prevention of spinal anaesthesia-induced hypotension was found, and crystalloid coload is recommended as the most appropriate fluid regimen. Expand
ROLE OF EPHEDRINE INFUSION IN SPINAL ANAESTHESIA INDUCED HYPOTENSION
Background: Spinal anaesthesia is commonly used during caesarean deliveries. In most of the cases hypotension is a common clinical problem after spinal anaesthesia for caesarean delivery. SevereExpand
Low-dose spinal anaesthesia for Caesarean section to prevent spinal-induced hypotension
TLDR
Low-dose spinal anaesthesia as part of a combined spinal–epidural technique is a valuable method in improving maternal and fetal outcome during anaesthesia for operative delivery. Expand
General versus spinal anaesthesia for elective caesarean sections: effects on neonatal short-term outcome. A prospective randomised study
  • A. Mancuso, A. de Vivo, +5 authors Alba Mancuso
  • Medicine
  • The journal of maternal-fetal & neonatal medicine : the official journal of the European Association of Perinatal Medicine, the Federation of Asia and Oceania Perinatal Societies, the International Society of Perinatal Obstetricians
  • 2010
TLDR
All kinds of anaesthesia seem to be safe, but loco-regional blockade shows more advantages on the neonatal outcome also when a conversion is necessary. Expand
Management of hypotension with vasopressors at caesarean section under spinal anaesthesia – have we found the Holy Grail of obstetric anaesthesia?
TLDR
It is surprising that management of spinal-induced hypotension for caesarean section continues to be highly variable, despite the outcomes of many well-performed clinical trials and recommendations from several review articles and editorials advocating phenylephrine as the vasopressor of choice. Expand
The incidence and management of hypotension in the pregnant parturients undergoing caesarean section following spinal anaesthesia with 0.5% bupivacaine
TLDR
The combined use of volume preloading to compensate for vasodilatation and vasopressor to counteract arterial dilatation is a very effective method in reducing the incidence, severity and duration of spiral hypotension. Expand
Maternal haemodynamic changes during spinal anaesthesia for caesarean section
TLDR
The most frequent response to spinal anaesthesia for elective caesarean section is a marked decrease in systemic vascular resistance and partial compensation from increased stroke volume and heart rate. Expand
Effectiveness of Intravenous Prophylactic Phenylephrine for the Prevention of Spinal Anaesthesia Induced Hypotension during Caesarean Section. A Prospective Observational Study
TLDR
Prophylactic intravenous phenylephrine bolus remarkably reduced the incidence of spinal induced hypotension compared to the non-treatment group and is recommended for parturients undergoing caesarean section under spinal anaesthesia. Expand
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