Technique, Results, and Complications Related to Robot-Assisted Stereoelectroencephalography.

@article{GonzlezMartnez2016TechniqueRA,
  title={Technique, Results, and Complications Related to Robot-Assisted Stereoelectroencephalography.},
  author={Jorge A. Gonz{\'a}lez-Mart{\'i}nez and Juan Bulacio and Susan Thompson and John T. Gale and Saksith Smithason and Imad M. Najm and William E. Bingaman},
  journal={Neurosurgery},
  year={2016},
  volume={78 2},
  pages={
          169-80
        }
}
BACKGROUND Robot-assisted stereoelectroencephalography (SEEG) may represent a simplified, precise, and safe alternative to the more traditional SEEG techniques. [] Key MethodMETHODS The prospective observational analyses included all patients with medically refractory focal epilepsy who underwent robot-assisted stereotactic placement of depth electrodes for extraoperative brain monitoring between November 2009 and May 2013. Technical nuances of the robotic implantation technique are presented, as well as…

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