Tay-Sachs screening: motives for participating and knowledge of genetics and probability.

Abstract

A highly-educated, socially aware group of persons presented themselves for Tay-Sachs screening having learned about it mainly from friends, newspapers, radio, and television but not from physicians or rabbis. After learning that screening was possible and deciding that it is in principle a good idea, and after discussing it with relatives and friends but not with physicians and rabbis, they presented themselves for the test. Although the participants knew that Tay-Sachs is a serious disease and that Jews are vulnerable, few of them knew much about the genetics of the disease, its frequency, or the incidence of the carrier state. This experience of screening for Tay-Sachs carriers suggests the need for physicians to learn the relation of genetics to preventive medicine, and for the public to learn more about the biology of man.

Cite this paper

@article{Childs1976TaySachsSM, title={Tay-Sachs screening: motives for participating and knowledge of genetics and probability.}, author={Barton Childs and Leon Gordis and Michael M. Kaback and Haig H. Kazazian}, journal={American journal of human genetics}, year={1976}, volume={28 6}, pages={537-49} }