Taxonomy of Haplosporangium parvum

@article{Ciferri2005TaxonomyOH,
  title={Taxonomy of Haplosporangium parvum},
  author={R. Ciferri and A. Montemartini},
  journal={Mycopathologia et mycologia applicata},
  year={2005},
  volume={10},
  pages={303-316}
}
A strain ofHaplosporangium parvum has been isolated from Italian soil. It has been comparatively studied with six North American and a Korean strain. Two American and the Italian strains are thermophilic (opt. about 35° C) while the other four grow better at temperatures around 20° C. The assimilation of nitrogen sources has been comparatively studied. In addition to peptoneH. parvum metabolizes urea and most aminoacids, whileH. bisporale assimilates peptone, leucine, alanine, glutamic acid and… Expand
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Material from moles found on the Berkshire Downs was examined in the course of a survey of animal mycoses sponsored by the Agricultural Research Council, and the spherules were recognized as bearing a close resemblance to those found in Haplosporangium parvum Emmons and Ashburn infection in small mammals. Expand
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Blakeslea, nov. gen. Mycelium copious, cottony; hyphae very irregular in diameter, the copious branches often rhizoidal and contorted and producing numerous intercalary chlamydospores. Sporangia ofExpand
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