Taxonomic status of the Australian dingo: the case for Canis dingo Meyer, 1793.

@article{Smith2019TaxonomicSO,
  title={Taxonomic status of the Australian dingo: the case for Canis dingo Meyer, 1793.},
  author={Bradley P. Smith and Kylie M. Cairns and Justin W. Adams and Thomas M. Newsome and Melanie Fillios and Elo{\"i}se C. D{\'e}aux and William C H Parr and Mike Letnic and Lily M. van Eeden and Robert G. Appleby and Corey J. A. Bradshaw and Peter Savolainen and Euan G. Ritchie and Dale G. Nimmo and Clare Archer-Lean and Aaron C. Greenville and Chris R. Dickman and Lynette Watson and Katherine E. Moseby and Tim S. Doherty and Arian D. Wallach and Damian S Morrant and Mathew S. Crowther},
  journal={Zootaxa},
  year={2019},
  volume={4564 1},
  pages={
          zootaxa.4564.1.6
        }
}
The taxonomic status and systematic nomenclature of the Australian dingo remain contentious, resulting in decades of inconsistent applications in the scientific literature and in policy. Prompted by a recent publication calling for dingoes to be considered taxonomically as domestic dogs (Jackson et al. 2017, Zootaxa 4317, 201-224), we review the issues of the taxonomy applied to canids, and summarise the main differences between dingoes and other canids. We conclude that (1) the Australian… 
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As the first study to incorporate a large sample set of K’gari dingoes, this provides invaluable baseline data for future research, which should incorporate genetic and demographic monitoring to ensure long-term persistence.
Metabolomics shows the Australian dingo has a unique plasma profile
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It is illustrated that the dingo metabolome is significantly different from domestic dog breeds and hybridisation is likely to influence carbohydrate metabolism.
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