Taxonomic and Nomenclatural Rearrangements in Artemisia Subgen. Tridentatae, Including a Redefinition of Sphaeromeria (Asteraceae, Anthemideae)

@inproceedings{Garcia2011TaxonomicAN,
  title={Taxonomic and Nomenclatural Rearrangements in Artemisia Subgen. Tridentatae, Including a Redefinition of Sphaeromeria (Asteraceae, Anthemideae)},
  author={S{\`o}nia Garcia and Teresa Garnatje and E. D. Mcarthur and Jaume Pellicer and Stewart C. Sanderson and Joan Vall{\`e}s},
  year={2011}
}
ABSTRACT. A recent molecular phylogenetic study of all members of Artemisia subgenus Tridentatae, as well as most of the other New World endemic Artemisia and the allied genera Sphaeromeria and Picrothamnus, raised the necessity of revising the taxonomic framework of the North American endemic Artemisia. Composition of the subgenus Tridentatae is enlarged to accommodate other North American endemics and is organized into 3 sections: Tridentatae, Nebulosae, and Filifoliae. This paper deals… Expand
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