Taxis bold as love: the influence of aggressive calls on acoustic attraction of female gray treefrogs, Hyla versicolor

@article{Schwartz2020TaxisBA,
  title={Taxis bold as love: the influence of aggressive calls on acoustic attraction of female gray treefrogs, Hyla versicolor},
  author={Joshua J. Schwartz and Alena Al-Bochi Mazie},
  journal={Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology},
  year={2020},
  volume={74}
}
We studied female phonotaxis in gray treefrogs to learn how male aggressive calling influences female choice of a mate from the perspective of the aggressive signaler and his male target. Although aggressive calls on their own attracted some females, when allowed to choose, all females preferred advertisement calls to aggressive calls. We wanted to ascertain also whether such calls could reduce the attractiveness of a nearby advertising male relative to an advertising male that was not close to… 

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TLDR
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