Tau/PTL-1 associates with kinesin-3 KIF1A/UNC-104 and affects the motor's motility characteristics in C. elegans neurons

@article{Tien2011TauPTL1AW,
  title={Tau/PTL-1 associates with kinesin-3 KIF1A/UNC-104 and affects the motor's motility characteristics in C. elegans neurons},
  author={Nai-Wen Tien and Gong-Her Wu and Chih Chun Hsu and Chien-Yu Chang and Oliver Ingvar Wagner},
  journal={Neurobiology of Disease},
  year={2011},
  volume={43},
  pages={495-506}
}

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