Tasty waste: industrial fermentation and the creative destruction of MSG

@article{Tracy2019TastyWI,
  title={Tasty waste: industrial fermentation and the creative destruction of MSG},
  author={Sarah E. Tracy},
  journal={Food, Culture \& Society},
  year={2019},
  volume={22},
  pages={548 - 565}
}
ABSTRACT Monosodium glutamate (MSG) traveled to America in the Pacific theatre of World War II. The flavor-enhancing food additive was known in the U.S. beforehand, but it was the experience of Japanese military rationing that drove American military and food industry interests to truly adopt the technology and to invest in domestic production. In 1957, researchers in Japan discovered a method of producing MSG with unprecedented efficiency and profitability: industrial fermentation. Industrial… Expand
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