Tasty figs and tasteless flies: plant chemical discrimination but no prey chemical discrimination in the cordylid lizard Platysaurus broadleyi

@article{Whiting2003TastyFA,
  title={Tasty figs and tasteless flies: plant chemical discrimination but no prey chemical discrimination in the cordylid lizard Platysaurus broadleyi},
  author={M. Whiting and W. Cooper},
  journal={acta ethologica},
  year={2003},
  volume={6},
  pages={13-17}
}
Lizards use visual and/or chemical cues to locate and identify food. The ability to discriminate prey chemical cues is affected by phylogeny, diet, and foraging mode. Augrabies flat lizards (Platysaurus broadleyi) are omnivorous members of the lizard clade Scleroglossa. Within Scleroglossa, all previously tested omnivores are capable of both prey and plant chemical discrimination. At Augrabies Falls National Park, P. broadleyi feed on both insects (black flies) and plant material (figs), and as… Expand

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