Targeting residual cardiovascular risk: raising high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels

@article{Hausenloy2008TargetingRC,
  title={Targeting residual cardiovascular risk: raising high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels},
  author={D. J. Hausenloy and DM Yellon},
  journal={Postgraduate Medical Journal},
  year={2008},
  volume={84},
  pages={590 - 598}
}
The last 20 years have witnessed dramatic reductions in cardiovascular risk using 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors (“statins”) to lower levels of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C). Using this approach one can achieve a reduction in the risk of major cardiovascular events of 21% for every 1 mmol/l (39 mg/dl) decrease in LDL-C. However, despite intensive therapy with high dose “statins” to lower LDL-C levels below 2.6 mmol/l (100 mg/dl), the risk of a major… 
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