Targeting inflammasomes in rheumatic diseases

Abstract

Inflammasomes are key inducers of inflammation in response to exogenous and endogenous stimuli, because they regulate the processing and secretion of the proinflammatory cytokines IL-1β and IL-18. Thus, inflammasomes have a crucial role in host defence against infection, but they can also be involved in inflammatory diseases. Indeed, the NLRP3 (NOD-, LRR- and pyrin domain-containing 3) inflammasome has been shown to play a part in several inflammatory rheumatic disorders, although the mechanisms involved are better elucidated in some of these diseases than in others. In particular, the pathogenesis of cryopyrin-associated periodic syndromes and microcrystal-induced arthritides is thought to be dependent on activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome, and IL-1 inhibition has shown efficacy as a therapeutic strategy in both groups of conditions. In this Review, we describe the current understanding of the mechanisms that trigger the inflammasome, and consider the relevance of the inflammasome to a variety of rheumatic diseases. In addition, we discuss the current therapies targeting this molecular complex, as well as future therapeutic prospects.

DOI: 10.1038/nrrheum.2013.61
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@article{So2013TargetingII, title={Targeting inflammasomes in rheumatic diseases}, author={Alexander Kai-Lik So and Annette Robyn Ives and Leo A B Joosten and Nathalie Busso}, journal={Nature Reviews Rheumatology}, year={2013}, volume={9}, pages={391-399} }