Targeting Bacterial Virulence: The Role of Protein Synthesis Inhibitors in Severe Infections

@article{Coyle2003TargetingBV,
  title={Targeting Bacterial Virulence: The Role of Protein Synthesis Inhibitors in Severe Infections},
  author={Elizabeth A. Coyle},
  journal={Pharmacotherapy: The Journal of Human Pharmacology and Drug Therapy},
  year={2003},
  volume={23}
}
  • Elizabeth A. Coyle
  • Published 1 May 2003
  • Medicine
  • Pharmacotherapy: The Journal of Human Pharmacology and Drug Therapy
Morbidity and mortality due to certain bacterial pathogens have not declined despite the availability of effective antimicrobial treatments. Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pyogenes cause a number of serious infections, such as necrotizing fasciitis and toxic shock syndrome, which are associated with the release of bacterial toxins. Animal studies have demonstrated clindamycin, a protein synthesis inhibitor, to be more effective in treating these severe infections than other more… Expand
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