Targeted Investigation of the Neandertal Genome by Array-Based Sequence Capture

@article{Burbano2010TargetedIO,
  title={Targeted Investigation of the Neandertal Genome by Array-Based Sequence Capture},
  author={Hern{\'a}n A. Burbano and Emily Hodges and Richard E. Green and Adrian W. Briggs and Johannes Krause and Matthias Meyer and Jeffrey Martin Good and Tomislav Maricic and Philip L. F. Johnson and Zhenyu Xuan and Michelle G. Rooks and Arindam Bhattacharjee and Leonardo Brizuela and Frank Wolfgang Albert and Marco de la Rasilla and Javier Fortea and Antonio Rosas and Michael Lachmann and Gregory J. Hannon and Svante P{\"a}{\"a}bo},
  journal={Science},
  year={2010},
  volume={328},
  pages={723 - 725}
}
Kissing Cousins Neandertals, our closest relatives, ranged across Europe and Southwest Asia before their extinction approximately 30,000 years ago. Green et al. (p. 710) report a draft sequence of the Neandertal genome, created from three individuals, and compare it with genomes of five modern humans. The results suggest that ancient genomes of human relatives can be recovered with acceptably low contamination from modern human DNA. Because ancient DNA can be contaminated with microbial DNA… 

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The genomic data suggest that Neandertals mixed with modern human ancestors some 120,000 years ago, leaving traces of Ne andertal DNA in contemporary humans, suggesting that gene flow from Neand Bertals into the ancestors of non-Africans occurred before the divergence of Eurasian groups from each other.

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