Tannins and human health: a review.

@article{Chung1998TanninsAH,
  title={Tannins and human health: a review.},
  author={K. T. Chung and T Y Wong and C. I. Wei and Y W Huang and Y. Lin},
  journal={Critical reviews in food science and nutrition},
  year={1998},
  volume={38 6},
  pages={
          421-64
        }
}
  • K. Chung, T. Wong, +2 authors Y. Lin
  • Published 1998
  • Chemistry, Medicine
  • Critical reviews in food science and nutrition
Tannins (commonly referred to as tannic acid) are water-soluble polyphenols that are present in many plant foods. They have been reported to be responsible for decreases in feed intake, growth rate, feed efficiency, net metabolizable energy, and protein digestibility in experimental animals. Therefore, foods rich in tannins are considered to be of low nutritional value. However, recent findings indicate that the major effect of tannins was not due to their inhibition on food consumption or… Expand
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Both in vitro and in vivo studies indicate that bean tannins decrease protein digestibility, either by inactivating digestive enzymes or by reducing the susceptibility of the substrate proteins after forming complexes with tannin-protein complexes and absorbed ionizable iron. Expand
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