Taming anxiety in laboratory mice

@article{Hurst2010TamingAI,
  title={Taming anxiety in laboratory mice},
  author={Jane L. Hurst and Rebecca S West},
  journal={Nature Methods},
  year={2010},
  volume={7},
  pages={825-826}
}
Routine laboratory animal handling has profound effects on their anxiety and stress responses, but little is known about the impact of handling method. We found that picking up mice by the tail induced aversion and high anxiety, whereas use of tunnels or open hand led to voluntary approach, low anxiety and acceptance of physical restraint. Using the latter methods, one can minimize a widespread source of anxiety in laboratory mice. 
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This work develops a method to inject substances to rats using a non-restrained technique and demonstrates a method which can be used to avoid physical restraint and highlights the negative welfare implications associated with physical restraint.
Identifying obstacles preventing the uptake of tunnel handling methods for laboratory mice: An international thematic survey
TLDR
An international online survey targeting individuals that work with and/or conduct research using laboratory mice aimed to identify the handling methods currently being used, and to determine common obstacles that may be preventing the wider uptake of non-aversive handling.
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