Talking Proper: The Rise of Accent as Social Symbol (review)

@article{Bailey2005TalkingPT,
  title={Talking Proper: The Rise of Accent as Social Symbol (review)},
  author={Richard W. Bailey},
  journal={Language},
  year={2005},
  volume={81},
  pages={269 - 271}
}

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