Taking a shine to it: How the preference for glossy stems from an innate need for water

Abstract

Human beings are attracted to glossy objects. However, the investigation of whether this preference for glossy is a systematic bias, and the rationale for why, has received little or no attention. Drawing on an evolutionary psychology framework, we propose and test the hypothesis that the preference for glossy stems from an innate preference for fresh water as a valuable resource. In a set of six studies we demonstrate the preference for glossy among both adults and young children (studies 1A, 1B and 2) ruling out a socialization explanation, investigate the hypothesis that the preference for glossy stems from an innate need for water as a resource (studies 3 and 5) and, in addition, rule out the more superficial account of glossy = pretty (study 4). The interplay between the different perspectives, implications of the findings and future research directions are discussed. © 2013 Society for Consumer Psychology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

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Cite this paper

@inproceedings{Meert2014TakingAS, title={Taking a shine to it: How the preference for glossy stems from an innate need for water}, author={Katrien W. Meert and Mario Pandelaere and Vanessa M. Patrick}, year={2014} }