Taking Credit: The Canadian Army Medical Corps and the British Conversion to Blood Transfusion in WWI

@article{Pelis2001TakingCT,
  title={Taking Credit: The Canadian Army Medical Corps and the British Conversion to Blood Transfusion in WWI},
  author={Kim Pelis},
  journal={Journal of the History of Medicine and Allied Sciences},
  year={2001},
  volume={56},
  pages={238 - 277}
}
  • K. Pelis
  • Published 2001
  • Medicine
  • Journal of the History of Medicine and Allied Sciences
La reintroduction de la transfusion sanguine aux Etats-Unis est decrite, ainsi que l'utilisation de la transfusion par la Grande-Bretagne lors de la premiere guerre mondiale. L'A. decrit egalement la contribution des medecins militaires canadiens et americains dans l'integration de la transfusion dans la pratique medicale britannique 

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