Take-all of wheat

@article{Cook2003TakeallOW,
  title={Take-all of wheat},
  author={Robert J. Cook},
  journal={Physiological and Molecular Plant Pathology},
  year={2003},
  volume={62},
  pages={73-86}
}
  • R. Cook
  • Published 2003
  • Biology
  • Physiological and Molecular Plant Pathology
Take-all, caused by the soilborne fungus Gaeumannomyces graminis var. tritici, is arguably the most-studied root disease of any crop, yet remains the most important root disease of wheat worldwide. S. D. Garrett launched the study of root diseases and soilborne pathogens as an independent field of science starting in the middle of the 20th century, inspired by and based in large part on his research on take-all during the first half of the 20th century. Because there has been neither a source… Expand
Take-all of Wheat and Natural Disease Suppression: A Review
In agro-ecosystems worldwide, some of the most important and devastating diseases are caused by soil-borne necrotrophic fungal pathogens, against which crop plants generally lack genetic resistance.Expand
Take-all decline in New Zealand wheat soils and the microorganisms associated with the potential mechanisms of disease suppression
TLDR
DGGE analyses of the microbial communities for five of the soils showed similar banding patterns for those with similar forms of suppression (specific, general and non-suppressive) and identified the potential microorganisms that distinguished them. Expand
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  • A. Rovira
  • Biology
  • Australasian Plant Pathology
  • 2011
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The aim of the research was to study the ecology and epidemiology of take-all in the field in relation to rotation and tillage systems, which expanded when early field experiments with soil fumigation and nematicides demonstrated the extent and magnitude of the cereal cyst nematode (CCN) problem caused by Heterodera avenae Woli. Expand
Take-All Decline and Beneficial Pseudomonads
TLDR
TAD is a spontaneous reduction in the incidence and severity of take-all occurring with monoculture of wheat or barley following a severe disease outbreak and is transferable, eliminated by soil pasteurization, and reduced by growing non-host crops. Expand
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TLDR
Year-to-year variation was the major factor in determining the amount of bacterial, Pseudomonas, fungal and Ggt DNA in the three fields and the main difference in the structure of bacterial communities was based on field type and the rhizosphere samples separated well from those of bulk soil. Expand
Alleviation of take-all in wheat by the earthworm Aporrectodea caliginosa (Savigny)
TLDR
The results suggest that relatively small earthworm populations may be sufficient to provide a degree of control where disease pressure is high and a positive correlation between earthworm reproductive success and suppressive soil properties was noted, believed to be the first to observe this. Expand
Exploring the genetic and mechanistic basis of resistance to take-all disease in wheat
TLDR
A range of diploid and hexaploid wheat germplasm that possess a promising level of take-all resistance under field conditions are characterised and considerable polymorphism may exist between homologous genes found in all three species. Expand
Take-all resistance of Lithuanian winter wheat breeding lines.
TLDR
Line resistance showed weak correlation with yield when all plot data were used for calculation, however, correlation coefficients considerably increased when ten percen t of each minimal, mean and maximal yields values were used. Expand
Effects of different rates of Gaeumannomyces graminis var. tritici inoculum for detecting take-all suppression in soils
TLDR
Root assessments of wheat plants after 4 weeks growth showed that 4 % of Ggt reduced root growth slightly, decreased water uptake of the wheat plants and effectively differentiated the suppressive activity of the soils, making it suitable for investigating take-all suppression in soils. Expand
Gaeumannomyces graminis, the take-all fungus and its relatives.
TLDR
Improvements are made in the development of improved methods for identification and in elucidating the role of the enzyme avenacinase as a pathogenicity determinant in the closely related oat take-all fungus (G. graminis var. avenae). Expand
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References

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TLDR
I-52, originally isolated from soil in a wheat field exhibiting suppression of take-all disease caused by Gaeumannomyces graminis var. Expand
Relationships between take-all, soil conduciveness to the disease, populations of fluorescent pseudomonads and nitrogen fertilizers
TLDR
The delay between reducing soil conduciveness and reducing disease in the field with ammonium nitrogen fertilization, the qualitative change of fluorescent pseudomonads populations and the role of necroses in rhizobacteria multiplication, provide information leading to the representation of a dynamic model based on the differentiation of the wheat root system into seminal and nodal roots. Expand
Natural plant protection by 2,4-diacetylphloroglucinol-producing Pseudomonas spp. in take-all decline soils
Take-all decline (TAD) is a natural biological control of the wheat root disease “take-all” that develops in response to the disease during extended monoculture of wheat. The research to date on TADExpand
Bacillus sp. L324-92 for Biological Control of Three Root Diseases of Wheat Grown with Reduced Tillage.
TLDR
The results suggest that Bacillus species with desired traits for biological control of wheat root diseases are present within the community of wheat rhizosphere microorganisms and can be recovered by protocols developed earlier for isolation of fluorescent Pseudomonas species effective against take-all. Expand
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TLDR
Benomyl, the standard in all tests, was consistently most effective: like iprodione, nuarimol and KWG 0599, it diminished infection from inoculum placed just below the seeds more effectively when applied as a drench than as a soil-mix. Expand
The role of bacteria in the biological control of Gaeumannomyces graminis by suppressive soils
TLDR
Both types of antagonism are probably operative in long-term wheat growing areas of the Pacific Northwest U.S.A. where take-all is virtually nonexistent and in much of the southern Australian wheat belt, where some general but rarely specific antagonism is apparently operative. Expand
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  • Biology, Medicine
  • Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
  • 1995
TLDR
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Soil-applied fungicides for controlling take-all in field experiments with winter-wheat
TLDR
Soil treatment fungicides were tested against take-all in three field experiments with winter wheat, and the most effective treatments were autumn applied benomyl and nuarimol. Expand
Distribution and importance of oat-attacking isolates of Gaeumannomyces graminis var. Tritici in Western Australia
TLDR
Oat-attacking isolates were more prevalent in the southern cereal-growing area, where oats are more frequently grown, than in the northern area, and those classed as pathogenic and causing significant top-weight reduction in barley in artificially inoculated pot and field experiments also caused significantTop- weight reduction in oats. Expand
Efficacy of MON65500 for controlling take-all of irrigated spring wheat in Northcentral China
TLDR
The lowest rate of this fungicide reduced the severity of root infection and occurrence of white heads, and increased grain yields by 4–27% depending on the product rate and location, and MON65500 can provide significant control of take-all and increase grain yields of spring wheat. Expand
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