Tail size and female choice in the guppy (Poecilia reticulata)

@article{Bischoff2004TailSA,
  title={Tail size and female choice in the guppy (Poecilia reticulata)},
  author={Robert Bischoff and James L. Gould and Daniel I. Rubenstein},
  journal={Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology},
  year={2004},
  volume={17},
  pages={253-255}
}
SummaryUnder laboratory conditions, female guppies demonstrate a clear preference for males with larger tails, and this preference translates into enhanced reproductive fitness for these males. Females also prefer males with higher display rates, a behavior which appears to be linked to tail size, but which can be experimentally disassociated. This appears to be a case of female-choice sexual selection. 
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TLDR
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