Tactile Hairs on the Postcranial Body in Florida Manatees: A Mammalian Lateral Line?

@article{Reep2002TactileHO,
  title={Tactile Hairs on the Postcranial Body in Florida Manatees: A Mammalian Lateral Line?},
  author={Roger Reep and Christopher D. Marshall and M.L. Stoll},
  journal={Brain, Behavior and Evolution},
  year={2002},
  volume={59},
  pages={141 - 154}
}
Previous reports have suggested that the sparsely distributed hairs found on the entire postcranial body of sirenians are all sinus type tactile hairs. This would represent a unique arrangement because no other mammal has been reported to possess tactile hairs except on restricted regions of the body, primarily the face. In order to investigate this issue further, hair counts were made systematically in three Florida manatees (Trichechus manatus latirostris), and hair follicle microanatomy was… Expand
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