Tactics of parasitic American coots: host choice and the pattern of egg dispersion among host nests

@article{Lyon2004TacticsOP,
  title={Tactics of parasitic American coots: host choice and the pattern of egg dispersion among host nests},
  author={Bruce E. Lyon},
  journal={Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology},
  year={2004},
  volume={33},
  pages={87-100}
}
  • B. Lyon
  • Published 1 August 1993
  • Biology
  • Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology
SummaryI examined the tactics adopted by a conspecific brood parasite, the American coot (Fulica americana), and the degree to which these tactics reflect sources of mortality for parasitic eggs. Only 8% of parasitic eggs produced independent offspring, compared to a 35% success rate for non-parasitic eggs, and most mortality was due to egg-rejection by hosts or the consequences of laying eggs too late in the host's nesting cycle. Parasites usually laid parasitically before initiating their own… 

Ecological and social constraints on conspecific brood parasitism by nesting female American coots (Fulica americana)

  • B. Lyon
  • Biology, Environmental Science
  • 2003
TLDR
The large number of correlates of parasitism indicates that parasitism by nesting females is a conditional reproductive tactic, not part of a stochastic mixed evolutionary stable strategy, and suggests that variation in egg-laying capacity may determine whether females benefit from allocating eggs to parasitism.

Differential responses to related hosts by nesting and non‐nesting parasites in a brood‐parasitic duck

TLDR
This study provides the first demonstration that nesting and non‐nesting parasites from the same population may use different host selection criteria, as well as investigating their age, structural size, body condition, nesting phenology or total brood size.

PATERNITY‐PARASITISM TRADE‐OFFS: A MODEL AND TEST OF HOST‐PARASITE COOPERATION IN AN AVIAN CONSPECIFIC BROOD PARASITE

TLDR
A cost‐benefit model is developed that clarifies the specific costs and benefits that influence host‐parasite cooperation and yields precise predictions about expected levels of host male paternity, which will enable a more rigorous assessment of field studies designed to test adaptive hypotheses of host‐ Parasite Cooperation.

Patterns of conspecific brood parasitism in zebra finches

Mechanism of egg recognition in defenses against conspecific brood parasitism: American coots (Fulica americana) know their own eggs

  • B. Lyon
  • Biology
    Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology
  • 2006
TLDR
The nonrandom incubation positions of parasitic eggs indicates that birds sometimes recognize parasitic eggs without rejecting them and provides a means of assessing recognition on a per nest basis in species with large clutches.

An obligate brood parasite trapped in the intraspecific arms race of its hosts

TLDR
It is shown that mismatches in adaptation of interacting species—an obligate brood parasitic duck and each of its two main hosts—are best explained by the evolutionary dynamics within the host species.

Responses of Black-headed Gulls Larus ridibundus to conspecific brood parasitism

TLDR
Contrast and intraclutch variation in ground color and spotting pattern and the volume of the egg had no significant effect on rejection behavior in either non-mimetic or mimetic eggs, but nest density significantly positively affected rejection behavior of the Black-headed Gulls in both non-Mimetic and mimetic treatments.

Molecular identification of brood‐parasitic females reveals an opportunistic reproductive tactic in ruddy ducks

TLDR
This study used protein fingerprinting from egg albumen and 10 microsatellite loci to genetically match parasitic ducklings to their mothers in a population of ruddy ducks, and found that parasitic egg laying was not influenced by nest loss, predation or female condition.

Egg removal by cuckoos forces hosts to accept parasite eggs

TLDR
A new hypothesis for explaining why a parasite removes host eggs before laying its own is provided, which provides a new explanation for egg removal behaviour and may explain other parasitic behaviours, such as egg damaging and egg puncturing, which lead to reductions in the host clutch size.
...

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