TYRANNOSAURUS REX FROM THE UPPER CRETACEOUS (MAASTRICHTIAN) NORTH HORN FORMATION OF UTAH: BIOGEOGRAPHIC AND PALEOECOLOGIC IMPLICATIONS

@inproceedings{Sampson2005TYRANNOSAURUSRF,
  title={TYRANNOSAURUS REX FROM THE UPPER CRETACEOUS (MAASTRICHTIAN) NORTH HORN FORMATION OF UTAH: BIOGEOGRAPHIC AND PALEOECOLOGIC IMPLICATIONS},
  author={Scott D. Sampson and Mark A Loewen},
  year={2005}
}
The discovery of a Tyrannosaurus rex specimen from the Upper Cretaceous (Maastrichtian) North Horn Formation provides the first documented occurrence of this theropod dinosaur from an upland, intermontane basin, as well as the first example from Utah. The partial skeleton further represents the only conclusive co-occurrence of this giant carnivore with a sauropod, Alamosaurus sanjuanensis. Integration of this find with biogeographic and paleoecological data derived from other specimens… 

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