TWO NEW PARROTS (PSITTACIFORMES) FROM THE LOWER EOCENE FUR FORMATION OF DENMARK

@article{Waterhouse2008TWONP,
  title={TWO NEW PARROTS (PSITTACIFORMES) FROM THE LOWER EOCENE FUR FORMATION OF DENMARK},
  author={David M. Waterhouse and Bent E. K. Lindow and Nikita V. Zelenkov and Gareth J. Dyke},
  journal={Palaeontology},
  year={2008},
  volume={51},
  pages={575-582}
}
Two new fossil psittaciform birds from the Lower Eocene 'Mo Clay' (Fur Formation) of Denmark (c. 54 Ma) are described. An unnamed specimen is assigned to the extinct avian family of stem-group parrots, Pseudas- turidae (genus and species incertae sedis), while a second (Mopsitta tanta gen. et sp. nov.) is the largest fossil parrot yet known. Both specimens are the first fossil records of these birds from Denmark. Although the phylogenetic posi- tion of Mopsitta is unclear (it is classified as… Expand

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