TREE-ROOSTING ECOLOGY OF REPRODUCTIVE FEMALE EASTERN PIPISTRELLES, PIPISTRELLUS SUBFLAVUS, IN INDIANA

@inproceedings{Veilleux2003TREEROOSTINGEO,
  title={TREE-ROOSTING ECOLOGY OF REPRODUCTIVE FEMALE EASTERN PIPISTRELLES, PIPISTRELLUS SUBFLAVUS, IN INDIANA},
  author={Jacques Pierre Veilleux and John O. Whitaker and Sherry L. Veilleux},
  year={2003}
}
Abstract We studied roosting ecology of reproductive (pregnant or lactating) adult female eastern pipistrelles (Pipistrellus subflavus) in Indiana. Nineteen bats were radiotagged and 37 roost trees identified. Pipistrelles roosted exclusively in foliage, typically in clusters of dead leaves (65%) and less often in live foliage (30%) or squirrel nests (5%). Oaks (Quercus species) were preferred as roost trees. Roost trees and height of foliage roosts were both located well below the forest… 
Reproductive stage influences roost use by tree roosting female eastern pipistrelles, Pipistrellus subflavus1
TLDR
It is stressed the importance of recognizing the potential for changes in habitat use by adult female bats during summer months depending on whether individuals are reproductive or non-reproductive, and combining data from reproductive classes of adult females may mask important roost characteristics unique to maternity colonies of bats.
Tree Roosting by Male and Female Eastern Pipistrelles in a Forested Landscape
Abstract Little information has been published on selection of tree roosts by eastern pipistrelles (Perimyotis subflavus) in forested environments, and no radiotelemetry-based studies have been
COLONIES AND REPRODUCTIVE PATTERNS OF TREE-ROOSTING FEMALE EASTERN PIPISTRELLE BATS
TLDR
This study is the first detailed description of tree colonies and reproductive patterns of eastern pipistrelles roosting in natural structures.
Intra-annual and Interannual Fidelity to Summer Roost Areas by Female Eastern Pipistrelles, Pipistrellus subflavus
TLDR
Evidence that female eastern pipistrelles are faithful to small roost areas both within and between years, and that juvenile females exhibit female natal philopatry is provided.
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Although roost sites are critically important to bats, we have few data on macrohabitat factors that affect roost selection by foliage roosting bats. Such data are needed so that forest managers can
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TLDR
To describe the basic social structure of tricolored bats, particularly females, in Nova Scotia, roosted exclusively in Usnea lichen, near water, with access to many potentially available roost sites in stands of mostly softwood trees.
PHYSIOLOGICAL AND ECOLOGICAL ASPECTS OF ROOST SELECTION BY REPRODUCTIVE FEMALE HOARY BATS (LASIURUS CINEREUS)
TLDR
The results provide direct evidence that hoary bats select forest roosts on the basis of microclimate and suggest that roost requirements of foliage-roosting species may be more specific than has been previously assumed.
Summer Roosting Ecology of the Northern Yellow Bat and Tri-Colored Bat in Coastal South Carolina
Abstract - Lasiurus intermedius (Northern Yellow Bat) and Perimyotis subflavus (Tricolored Bat) are species of conservation concern in South Carolina and are threatened by loss of roosting habitat.
Winter roosting ecology of tricolored bats (Perimyotis subflavus) in trees and bridges
Tricolored bats (Perimyotis subflavus) that roost in subterranean hibernacula have experienced precipitous declines from white-nose syndrome (WNS); however, understudied populations also use during
Use of Lichen as a Roosting Substrate by Perimyotis subflavus, the Tricolored Bat, in Nova Scotia
TLDR
An apparently disjunct population of tricolored bats (Perimyotis subflavus) exists in southwest Nova Scotia and there is an apparently unique relationship between lichens and bats that likely impacts many aspects of the species biology, including distribution, social structure, and parasite prevalence.
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TLDR
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TLDR
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