Corpus ID: 132281768

TRACKING AS AN ACTIVITY INDEX TO MEASURE GROSS CHANGES IN NORWAY RAT POPULATIONS

@inproceedings{Quy1993TRACKINGAA,
  title={TRACKING AS AN ACTIVITY INDEX TO MEASURE GROSS CHANGES IN NORWAY RAT POPULATIONS},
  author={Roger J. Quy and David P. Cowan and Tom Swinney},
  year={1993}
}
The efficacy of methods to manage Norway rat (Rattus norvegicus) populations, particularly the use of rodenticides, has been assessed with indirect census methods that measure changes in levels of rodent activity (Kaukeinen 1979, 1984). These techniques are less labor intensive and cause less disruption to study populations than direct census methods such as mark-recapture (Taylor et al. 1981), but they only produce an index of rat activity. Reductions in such indices may not necessarily… Expand
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