TLR7: A new sensor of viral infection.

@article{Crozat2004TLR7AN,
  title={TLR7: A new sensor of viral infection.},
  author={Karine Crozat and Bruce Beutler},
  journal={Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America},
  year={2004},
  volume={101 18},
  pages={
          6835-6
        }
}
  • K. Crozat, B. Beutler
  • Published 2004
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
The preponderance of mammalian resistance to infection is inherited rather than acquired. Even without lymphoid cells, mammals still protect themselves. They respond violently to bacteria, fungi, and viruses; or, more precisely, to specific molecular components of these organisms. Most of the molecular targets for recognition have been known for decades (1). However, only recently have the receptors and pathways for innate immune sensing been elucidated, and at that, only in part. The molecular… Expand
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