THIEVES, CONVICTS AND THE INMATE CULTURE JOHN IRWIN and DONALD R. CRESSEY

Abstract

tries which make use of a union hiring hall. In the absence of studies which isolate the effect of such factors, our findings cannot readily be generalized. It is tempting to suggest after an initial look at the results that social class differences provide the explanation. But subsequent analysis and research might well reveal significant intra-class variations, depending on the distribution of other operative factors. A lower class person with a scarce specialty and a protective occupational group who is acquitted of a lightly regarded offense might benefit from the accusation. Nevertheless, class in general seems to correlate with the relevant factors to such an extent that in reality the law regularly works to the disadvantage of the already more disadvantaged classes.

Cite this paper

@inproceedings{Garrity2012THIEVESCA, title={THIEVES, CONVICTS AND THE INMATE CULTURE JOHN IRWIN and DONALD R. CRESSEY}, author={Donald L. Garrity}, year={2012} }