THERMOREGULATORY ADAPTATIONS ALLOWING ECOLOGICAL RANGE EXPANSION BY THE PIERID BUTTERFLY, NATHALIS IOLE BOISDUVAL

@article{Douglas1978THERMOREGULATORYAA,
  title={THERMOREGULATORY ADAPTATIONS ALLOWING ECOLOGICAL RANGE EXPANSION BY THE PIERID BUTTERFLY, NATHALIS IOLE BOISDUVAL},
  author={Matthew M. Douglas and John W. Grula},
  journal={Evolution},
  year={1978},
  volume={32}
}
An important goal of ecology is to understand the evolution of adaptations that allow organisms to expand their distributions and/or become more abundant (Andrewartha and Birch, 1954). Range expansion involving adaptations to new environments has been termed ecological expansion by Lewontin and Birch (1966). In contrast, geographical expansion entails range extension due to the removal of certain physical barriers or to sudden alterations of the environment, usually by man. While geographical… 
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