THE TRANSPORT AND FUNCTION OF SILICON IN PLANTS

@article{Raven1983THETA,
  title={THE TRANSPORT AND FUNCTION OF SILICON IN PLANTS},
  author={John A. Raven},
  journal={Biological Reviews},
  year={1983},
  volume={58}
}
  • J. Raven
  • Published 1 May 1983
  • Biology, Environmental Science
  • Biological Reviews
A number of lines of evidence (Mr, number of ‐OH groups, measured fluxes at inner mitochondrial membranes) suggest the intrinsic PSi(OH)4 of about 10‐10 m s‐1 in the plant cell plasmalemma. While relatively low, such a PSi(OH)4 could maintain the intracellular concentration of Si(OH)4 equal to that in the medium for a phytoplankton cell of 5 μm radius growing with a generation time of 24 h. Such passive entry could not account for SiO, precipitation such as is required for scale (Chrysophyceae… 

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