THE STRUCTURE OF SOCIAL RELATIONSHIPS AMONG FEMALE SAVANNA BABOONS IN MOREMI RESERVE, BOTSWANA

@article{Silk1999THESO,
  title={THE STRUCTURE OF SOCIAL RELATIONSHIPS AMONG FEMALE SAVANNA BABOONS IN MOREMI RESERVE, BOTSWANA},
  author={Joan B. Silk and Robert M. Seyfarth and Dorothy L. Cheney},
  journal={Behaviour},
  year={1999},
  volume={136},
  pages={679-703}
}
Here we examine the effects of maternal kinship, reciprocity, and dominance rank on the social relationships of female baboons (Papio cynocephalus ursinus) in a well-habituated, free-ranging group in the Okavango Delta of Botswana. These data are useful for testing comparative hypotheses about the ecological and demographic factors that shape the evolution of social organization in primates and other animals. In this group, adult females had well-differentiated grooming relationships with one… 

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