THE SOUTHERN ATHAPASKAN LANGUAGES

@article{Hoijer1938THESA,
  title={THE SOUTHERN ATHAPASKAN LANGUAGES},
  author={Harry Hoijer},
  journal={American Anthropologist},
  year={1938},
  volume={40},
  pages={75-87}
}
  • H. Hoijer
  • Published 3 January 1938
  • History
  • American Anthropologist
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TLDR
This dissertation explores the linguistic effects of contact between Athabaskan populations that resulted when indigenous people of California and Oregon were dispossessed and consolidated on a small number of reservations in the mid-19th century and suggests that a theory allowing for the maintenance of dialect differences via social-indexical considerations does a better job of explaining the full range of observed outcomes. Expand
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References

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A List of Chipewyan Stems
  • F. Li
  • Sociology
  • International Journal of American Linguistics
  • 1933
b, d, g, d6, dz, dj and dl are the voiceless unaspirated stops and affricatives with a soft articulation, intermediate between the truly voiced b, d, etc, and the voiceless hard p, t, etc. t and kExpand
A Study of Sarcee Verb-Stems
  • F. Li
  • Sociology
  • International Journal of American Linguistics
  • 1930
The Sarcee language, spoken by the Sarcee Indians, who are now located on a reserve near Calgary, Alberta, Canada, belongs to the Athapaskan stock, one of the most widely distributed families ofExpand