THE SIGNIFICANCE OF CERTAIN PULMONARY LESIONS IN RELATION TO THE ETIOLOGY OF INFLUENZA

@article{GoodpastureTHESO,
  title={THE SIGNIFICANCE OF CERTAIN PULMONARY LESIONS IN RELATION TO THE ETIOLOGY OF INFLUENZA},
  author={Ernest W. Goodpasture},
  journal={The American Journal of The Medical Sciences},
  volume={158},
  pages={863–870}
}
  • E. Goodpasture
  • Published 1 November 1919
  • Medicine
  • The American Journal of The Medical Sciences
The great variations in the results of bacteriological analyses of the lungs and respiratory tract of those dead of influenza have left no common ground for agreement upon any one microörganism as the etiological agent of this disease. Although in certain sections of the country evidence seemed to be strongly in favor of Pfeiffer’s bacillus,1 the failure to find this microörganism and the predominance of other invading bacteria in different localities have served in large measure to counteract… 
The Pathophysiology of Influenzal Pneumonia in 1918
  • K. M. Stevens
  • Medicine, Biology
    Perspectives in biology and medicine
  • 1981
TLDR
It was subsequently shown that either human or swine strains of virus could produce fatal disease in experimental animals without the presence of H. influenzae or other bacteria, and it was proposed that this synergistic combination was probably responsible for influenza in man.
THE INFLUENZA EPIDEMIC AT CAMP DEVENS IN 1918: A STUDY OF THE PATHOLOGY OF THE FATAL CASES
TLDR
This study has brought out some interesting points which have not been emphasized by other workers, and as it is possible from this material to form a definite opinion in regard to the course of the lesions in the different organs and their relation to various bacteria present, it seems advisable to publish the report.
Studies on influenza in the pandemic of 1957-1958. II. Pulmonary complications of influenza.
TLDR
The microbiologic and pathologic evidence accumulated during the 1918-19 pandemic established the probable bacterial etiology of most influenza fatalities and marked the first recognition of the influenza A virus.
PATEHOLOGY OF STAPHYLOCOCCAL PNEUMONIA COMPLICATING CLICAL INFLUENZA *
TLDR
Among the paints with pneumonia who were seen during is period, there was an unusually large number in whom Stapkyiococcus aweus was the only, or the predominant, organism found in cultures from sputum, lungs, blood, or pleural fluid.
Bronchotracheal response in human influenza. Type A, Asian strain, as studied by light and electron microscopic examination of bronchoscopic biopsies.
TLDR
This is the first description as studied by bronchoscopic biopsy of the mucosal response in humans to uncomplicated influenza, and to the authors' knowledge this is theFirst description of the tracheobronchial tree in influenza uncomplication by bacterial infection.
Pathologic findings in the lungs of five cases from which influenza virus was isolated.
Reports in the literature of fatal cases from which influenza virus has been isolated are remarkably few, and still fewer are the descriptions of the pathologic changes in the lungs in such cases. We
Viruses and kidney disease.
[Severe "malignant" influenza in the light of past history].
Nonsuppurative poststreptococcic (rheumatic) pneumonitis; pathologic anatomy and clinical differentiation from primary atypical pneumonia.
TLDR
It is not yet possible, however, to identify the disease solely on the basis of a single anatomic change in the lungs alone—to recognize any one feature as pathognomonic.
Inflammatory disease of the human lung of definite or presumed viral origin. Cytologic and histologic topics.
  • H. Schaefer
  • Medicine
    Current topics in pathology. Ergebnisse der Pathologie
  • 1983
TLDR
The pathoanatomical changes associated with banal viral infections of the upper respiratory tract, may be readily observed in biopsies from the nasal mucosa as documented in studies by Hilding and Tyrell and Parsons (1960).
...
...