THE SEPIK HILL LANGUAGES: A PRELIMINARY REPORT

@article{Dye1968THESH,
  title={THE SEPIK HILL LANGUAGES: A PRELIMINARY REPORT},
  author={W. Dye and Patricia K. Townsend and William H. Townsend},
  journal={Oceania},
  year={1968},
  volume={39},
  pages={146-156}
}
Most of the languages dealt with here are spoken by people who have traditionally lived in hilltop villages and hamlets. Hence we have called them the Sepik Hill languages. In the last generation, the desire for contact and the encouragement of the Administration have led many of these people to leave the hills for new sites on the rivers, a process which is still under way. Because most recent cultural influences have moved up the Sepik and its tributaries, the acculturative gradient runs both… 
10 Citations
Stone and steel tool use in a New Guinea society
The Heve people live in the foothills adjacent to the Wogamus River, a southern tributary of the Sepik River, in New Guinea, at a latitude of 4?32'i9" South and a longitude of I42?i3/i6" East. They
HABITAT, ISOLATION AND SUBSISTENCE ECONOMY IN THE CENTRAL RANGE OF NEW GUINEA
A LL human beings subsisted by hunting and gathering until about 10,000 years ago. -**• These people currently constitute less than 1% of the total human population. They exist in isolated areas of
LINGUISTIC RESEARCH IN AUSTRALIA, NEW GUINEA, AND OCEANIA
Australia and the insular world adjacent to it in the north and east contain about one-third of all the languages in the world — the New Guinea area alone around one thousand, and Australia about two
New Guinea sago gatherers. A study of demography in relation to subsistence.
Records of fertility and infant mortality were collected from the twenty‐five women who had completed their reproductive cycle and who were part of a population living on the Wogamus River in the
Sago production in a New Guinea economy
The techniques used by the Sanio-Hiowe of Papua New Guinea to produce edible starch from the sago palm (Metroxylon sp.) are described. Input-output analysis demonstrates that this is a highly
Pronouns and the (Preliminary) Classification of Papuan languages
A series of articles by Ross (1995, 2001, 2005) use pronoun similarities to gauge relatedness between various Papuan microgroups, arguing that the similarities could not be the result of chance or
Free-Sorting of Colors Across Cultures: Are there Universal Grounds for Grouping?
These studies examined naming and free-sorting behavior by informants speaking a wide range of languages, from both industrialized and traditional cultures. Groups of informants, whose color

References

SHOWING 1-4 OF 4 REFERENCES
The Ok language family in New Guinea
A group of at least ten languages located around the junction of the borders of Irian Barat, the Territory of New Guinea, and Papua is examined and it is demonstrated that they constitute a single