THE SELF‐HELP ORGANIZATION IN THE MENTAL HEALTH FIELD: RECOVERY, INC., A CASE STUDY

@article{Wechsler1960THESO,
  title={THE SELF‐HELP ORGANIZATION IN THE MENTAL HEALTH FIELD: RECOVERY, INC., A CASE STUDY},
  author={Howard J. Wechsler},
  journal={The Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease},
  year={1960},
  volume={130},
  pages={297–314}
}
  • H. Wechsler
  • Published 1 April 1960
  • Medicine, Psychology
  • The Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease
THE SELF-HELP ORGANIZATION IN THE MENTAL HEALTH FIELD: RECOVERY, INC., A CASE STUDY HENRY WECHSLER; The Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease 
Recovery, Inc. and Quality Assurances in Organized Self-Help
TLDR
An empirical survey of 393 leaders of Recovery's self-help groups documents those norms of recruitment, training, and peer review which constitute this alternative provider's ongoing quality assurance program.
Self-help participation and quality of life: a study of the staff of Recovery, Inc.
TLDR
The data indicates that Recovery participation is associated with positive mental status reports, particularly in global self-ratings, and the general findings are compared to a normative population.
Obesity and the self-help group: a look at TOPS.
TLDR
The membership and dynamics of self-help weight-reduction groups, which are successful for a number of obese women, are explored and the authors were struck by the theme of aggression played out among members.
Zealous self-help groups as adjuncts to psychiatric treatment: a study of Recovery, Inc.
  • M. Galanter
  • Psychology, Medicine
    The American journal of psychiatry
  • 1988
TLDR
It is concluded that peer-led self-help groups have value as an adjunct to psychiatric treatment.
The professional connection with self-help groups in health care settings.
TLDR
A framework for the professional social worker to view theSelf-help phenomenon is provided, a typology of self-help groups relating to health care agencies is presented, and the role of social work in several self- help groups is described.
Situation/transition groups: a conceptualization and review.
  • M. Schwartz
  • Psychology
    The American journal of orthopsychiatry
  • 1975
TLDR
Small discussion-education groups moderated by a trained leader have been used in a variety of settings for the mutual assistance of individuals who share some stressful life situation, and it is found they have common characteristics, modes of function, and problems of leadership.
Professional views of self-help groups
TLDR
Results suggest that professionals may hold certain attitudes that may interfere with collaboration with self-help organizations and that the settings in which professionals work have more impact on their views of helping groups than their professional identity.
Capturing Dynamic Processes of Change in GROW Mutual Help Groups for Mental Health
TLDR
The GROW findings are used to assist development of a dynamic multi-dimensional process model to explain how MHGMHs may promote positive change.
A comparison of espoused theories of self- and mutual help: implications for mental health professionals
Nonprofessional helping organizations, known as selfor mutual-help groups, are viewed as homogeneous, varying primarily in the problem addressed. However, there is great diversity in their methods,
Day hospital treatment for people with severe mental illness according to users’ perspectives: what helps and what hinders recovery?
TLDR
Being active again was considered to be the main recovery indicator in this cultural context and participating in activities led by skilled facilitators was the most beneficial factor of the program according to the users.
...
...