THE ROYAL SOCIETY AND THE PREHISTORY OF PEER REVIEW, 1665–1965

@article{Moxham2017THERS,
  title={THE ROYAL SOCIETY AND THE PREHISTORY OF PEER REVIEW, 1665–1965},
  author={Noah Moxham and Aileen Fyfe},
  journal={The Historical Journal},
  year={2017},
  volume={61},
  pages={863 - 889}
}
Abstract Despite being coined only in the early 1970s, ‘peer review’ has become a powerful rhetorical concept in modern academic discourse, tasked with ensuring the reliability and reputation of scholarly research. Its origins have commonly been dated to the foundation of the Philosophical Transactions in 1665, or to early learned societies more generally, with little consideration of the intervening historical development. It is clear from our analysis of the Royal Society's editorial… 
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