THE ROLE OF SOLAR OBSERVATIONS IN DEVELOPING THE PRECLASSIC MAYA CALENDAR

@article{Milbrath2017THERO,
  title={THE ROLE OF SOLAR OBSERVATIONS IN DEVELOPING THE PRECLASSIC MAYA CALENDAR},
  author={Susan Milbrath},
  journal={Latin American Antiquity},
  year={2017},
  volume={28},
  pages={88 - 104}
}
  • S. Milbrath
  • Published 1 March 2017
  • History
  • Latin American Antiquity
Intervals of 260 days are recorded by architectural orientations at a number of Maya sites, a pattern that may have developed early at sites such as Nakbe. The 260-day calendar, emphasizing sets of 13 and 20 days, dates back to the Middle Preclassic, when early E-Groups in the Maya area were used for solar observations. These observations were probably linked with a maize cycle spanning 260 days. By the end of the Late Preclassic, however, most E-Groups were abandoned or modified for a… 
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