THE ROLE OF LIZARDS IN THE ECOLOGY OF LYME DISEASE IN TWO ENDEMIC ZONES OF THE NORTHEASTERN UNITED STATES

@inproceedings{Giery2007THERO,
  title={THE ROLE OF LIZARDS IN THE ECOLOGY OF LYME DISEASE IN TWO ENDEMIC ZONES OF THE NORTHEASTERN UNITED STATES},
  author={Sean T. Giery and Richard S. Ostfeld},
  booktitle={The Journal of parasitology},
  year={2007}
}
We examined the role of lizards in the ecology of Lyme disease in New York and Maryland. We collected data on vector tick infestations, measured lizard “realized” reservoir competence for the Lyme disease spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi, and estimated lizard population density. These data were incorporated into a model that predicts a host's ability to influence the prevalence of B. burgdorferi in the tick population, a primary risk factor in the epidemiology of Lyme disease. Published data on… 

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