THE RED SUPERGIANT CONTENT OF M31

@article{Massey2016THERS,
  title={THE RED SUPERGIANT CONTENT OF M31},
  author={Philip Massey and Kate Anne Evans},
  journal={The Astrophysical Journal},
  year={2016},
  volume={826}
}
We investigate the red supergiant (RSG) population of M31, obtaining the radial velocities of 255 stars. These data substantiate membership of our photometrically selected sample, demonstrating that Galactic foreground stars and extragalactic RSGs can be distinguished on the basis of B − V, V − R two-color diagrams. In addition, we use these spectra to measure effective temperatures and assign spectral types, deriving physical properties for 192 RSGs. Comparison with the solar metallicity… 

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