THE PSYCHOLOGY OF REBELLION: COLONIAL MEDICAL RESPONSES TO DISSENT IN BRITISH EAST AFRICA

@article{Mahone2006THEPO,
  title={THE PSYCHOLOGY OF REBELLION: COLONIAL MEDICAL RESPONSES TO DISSENT IN BRITISH EAST AFRICA},
  author={Sloan Mahone},
  journal={The Journal of African History},
  year={2006},
  volume={47},
  pages={241 - 258}
}
  • S. Mahone
  • Published 1 July 2006
  • History
  • The Journal of African History
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References

however, on this point see J. C. Carothers, The Psychology of Mau Mau
  • 1954