THE PRESS, PATRIOTISM, AND PUBLIC DISCUSSION: C. P. SCOTT, THE MANCHESTER GUARDIAN, AND THE BOER WAR, 1899–1902

@article{Hampton2001THEPP,
  title={THE PRESS, PATRIOTISM, AND PUBLIC DISCUSSION: C. P. SCOTT, THE MANCHESTER GUARDIAN, AND THE BOER WAR, 1899–1902},
  author={Mark Andrew Hampton},
  journal={The Historical Journal},
  year={2001},
  volume={44},
  pages={177 - 197}
}
  • M. Hampton
  • Published 1 March 2001
  • Political Science
  • The Historical Journal
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