THE POPULATION OF PROPELLERS IN SATURN'S A RING

@article{Tiscareno2007THEPO,
  title={THE POPULATION OF PROPELLERS IN SATURN'S A RING},
  author={Matthew S. Tiscareno and Joseph A. Burns and Matthew M. Hedman and Carolyn C. Porco},
  journal={The Astronomical Journal},
  year={2007},
  volume={135},
  pages={1083 - 1091}
}
We present an extensive data set of ∼150 localized features from Cassini images of Saturn's A ring, a third of which are demonstrated to be persistent by their appearance in multiple images, and half of which are resolved well enough to reveal a characteristic “propeller” shape. We interpret these features as the signatures of small moonlets embedded within the ring, with diameters between 40 and 500 m. The lack of significant brightening at high phase angle indicates that they are likely… 

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