THE PARADOXICAL EFFECTS OF PURSUING POSITIVE EMOTION When and Why Wanting to Feel Happy Backfi res

@inproceedings{Ford2013THEPE,
  title={THE PARADOXICAL EFFECTS OF PURSUING POSITIVE EMOTION When and Why Wanting to Feel Happy Backfi res},
  author={Brett Q. Ford and Iris B. Mauss},
  year={2013}
}
T he experience of positive emotion is generally associated with, and even leads to, positive outcomes (Fredrickson, Cohn, Coff ey, Pek, & Finkel, 2008; Lyubomirsky, King, & Diener, 2005; Seligman & Csikszentmihalyi, 2000). However, it is less clear what outcomes are associated with pursuing positive emotion. Exploring the correlates and eff ects of pursuing positive emotion is important and interesting for two reasons. First, many people want to feel positive emotion, and this goal is very… Expand
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