THE PALEOBIOLOGICAL IMPLICATIONS OF HERBIVOROUS DINOSAUR COPROLITES FROM THE UPPER CRETACEOUS TWO MEDICINE FORMATION OF MONTANA: WHY EAT WOOD?

@inproceedings{Chin2007THEPI,
  title={THE PALEOBIOLOGICAL IMPLICATIONS OF HERBIVOROUS DINOSAUR COPROLITES FROM THE UPPER CRETACEOUS TWO MEDICINE FORMATION OF MONTANA: WHY EAT WOOD?},
  author={K. Chin},
  year={2007}
}
Abstract Rare assemblages of woody coprolites from different strata of the Two Medicine Formation provide surprising perspectives on the feeding behavior of Late Cretaceous ornithischian dinosaurs. Most of the irregularly shaped, calcareous specimens are largely composed of fragmented conifer wood (13%–85%) and can be identified as coprolites by the presence of distinctive backfilled dung beetle burrows. The large size (up to 7 L in volume), fibrous contents, and associated bones and eggshell… Expand
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