THE OSTEOLOGY OF MASIAKASAURUS KNOPFLERI, A SMALL ABELISAUROID (DINOSAURIA: THEROPODA) FROM THE LATE CRETACEOUS OF MADAGASCAR

@inproceedings{Carrano2002THEOO,
  title={THE OSTEOLOGY OF MASIAKASAURUS KNOPFLERI, A SMALL ABELISAUROID (DINOSAURIA: THEROPODA) FROM THE LATE CRETACEOUS OF MADAGASCAR},
  author={Matthew T. Carrano and Scott D. Sampson and Catherine A Forster},
  year={2002}
}
Abstract We describe the osteology of the new small theropod dinosaur Masiakasaurus knopfleri, from the Late Cretaceous Maevarano Formation of northwestern Madagascar. Approximately 40% of the skeleton is known, including parts of the jaws, axial column, forelimb, pelvic girdle, and hind limb. The jaws of Masiakasaurus are remarkably derived, bearing a heterodont, procumbent dentition that is unknown elsewhere among dinosaurs. The vertebrae are similar to those of abelisauroids in the reduction… 

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